Moral Heuristics: the History of Research

SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY

  • Vitaliy Nadurak
Keywords: heuristics, moral heuristics, social heuristics, attribute substitution, consequen- tialism, moral intuition

Abstract

The paper presents an analytical review of main studies of moral heuristics. Studies of moral heuristics result from the expanding of the scope of the studies of heuristics (methods that give opportunity to make decisions with minimal cognitive efforts) to the domain of mo- rality. Accordingly moral heuristics are the methods that make moral decision-making easier. These methods mostly include the use of simple norms (“do not kill”, “do not steal”), the decision-making based on emotional reactions, the use of simple rules such us “imitate your peers or somebody authoritative”, “follow default behavior” etc. Although researchers agree that in everyday life people make moral decisions using heuristics, they have different opinions according to their effectiveness: some of them focus on fallibility of such decisions while others — on their correctness. In this connection the problem of the criterion of correctness of moral decision is quite urgent. The significance of the re- search of moral heuristics for moral philosophy, firstly, relates to the fact that such research can make a significant contribution to solving some of its key problems: to propose new arguments for discussion between deontological and consequential ethics; to clarify nature and status of moral intuition and the role of emotions in moral life of a person.

Author Biography

Vitaliy Nadurak

doctor of sciences (philosophy), professor at the Department of Philosophy, Sociology and Religious Studies, Vasyl Stefanyk Precarpathian National University (Ivano-Fran- kivsk). Scientific interests: ethics, moral decision-making theory.

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Published
2020-07-14
How to Cite
Nadurak, V. (2020). Moral Heuristics: the History of Research. Filosofska Dumka, (4), 71-84. Retrieved from https://dumka.philosophy.ua/index.php/fd/article/view/428